Print
PDF

Ski Team Snowboarding News


powered by US Ski Team





World Cup Coming to Squaw Valley

OLYMPIC VALLEY, CA (Sept.17, 2014) - The fast-paced excitement of skicross and snowboardcross will come to Squaw Valley March 4-8, 2015, with the resort hosting an Audi FIS Skicross World Cup and FIS Snowboard World Cup. This will be the first time the International Ski Federation has brought a World Cup event to Squaw Valley since the FIS Alpine World Cup in 1969. The event will feature the top global stars in the sport, including local Olympian and seven-time X Games champion Nate Holland. Cross racing pits four athletes against each other to race head-to-head down a course of jumps, bumps and berms. Snowboardcross made its Olympic debut in 2006, with skicross in 2010, and both events were among the top spectator events in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.
 
HIGHLIGHTS
  • Squaw Valley will be the site of an Audi FIS Skicross World Cup and FIS Snowboard World Cup March 4-8.
  • Officials from the International Ski Federation did a final inspection at Squaw Valley this week giving the event the go-ahead.
  • The cross tour features head-to-head racing that has proven to be popular with spectators and one of the most watched events in the Olympics.
  • Perspective: It’s the first time the International Ski Federation has brought its World Cup tour to the Olympic resort since the FIS Alpine World Cup was held there in 1969.
  • Who to Watch: Local SBX hero Nate Holland (Squaw Valley, CA), Olympic SBX champion Seth Wescott (Sugarloaf, ME), Olympic SBX medalists Alex Deibold (Boulder, CO) and Lindsey Jacobellis (Stratton Mountain, VT) and World Cup skicross winner John Teller (Mammoth Mountain, CA).
  • What’s at Stake: With the 2015 season in the homestretch, few events remain after the Squaw Valley World Cup so points earned here will be vital for those seeking the crystal globe.
  • Why Squaw? Legacy of huge race crowds, great terrain, iconic resort with global stature. Squaw was the host to the U.S. Alpine Ski Championships, as well as the U.S. Freestyle Championships several years ago, plus was a key stop on the King of the Mountain Tour. Every Squaw event was highlighted by huge crowds.
  • What Fans Will See? Cross racing pits four athletes at a time head to head cruising down a course of jumps, bumps and berms. Snowboardcross made its Olympic debut in 2006, with skicross in 2010.
  • TV Tunein: The event will be broadcast on NBC and NBCSN, featuring same weekend coverage.

 
QUOTES
Calum Clark, Vice President, Events, U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association
Squaw Valley has been a remarkable venue for our U.S. Championships and other major events with quality courses and enthusiastic spectator interest. It’s been a goal for us to bring international events to Squaw to showcase the best athletes in the world – especially skicross and snowboardcross where we have a strong local athlete legacy.
 
Uwe Beier, FIS Snowboard World Cup Tour Director
Squaw Valley is a first time World Cup host and the home arena of one of the most famous and successful SBX snowboarders, Nate Holland. It will mark the comeback of the successful combined skicross and snowboardcross events to America for the first time in two years.
 

Fri, 19 Sep 2014 12:19:40 +0000

TAKE 5 with U.S. Snowboarding’s Julia Marino

When watching your child play sports, it’s natural to get excited. But it’s also important to make sure you always act as a Positive Sport Parent – on game day and beyond.

Being a Positive Sport Parent means not only keeping your emotions in check on game day, but also always remaining supportive and respectful of your youth athlete – as well as all the other kids and coaches involved in the competition. It’s also vital to remember that as a parent, you have the power to help shape your youth athlete’s attitude about sports.

Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive sat down with budding young U.S. Snowboarding standout Julia Marino to get her thoughts on what it means to be a Positive Sport Parent.

In our exclusive TAKE 5 interview, Julia told us that her parents have always been “super supportive” of her athletic endeavors and career.

“My parents have always been very involved in every sport I do, snowboarding in particular,” said Julia, who is still a teenager. “They are always excited to travel with me and meet my coaches and do whatever it takes for me to get the most out of my snowboard experience.”

Julia added that her mother “usually cheers more” than her father, because “she gets really excited seeing me snowboard.” It’s her father, however, who travels more with her as her snowboarding career continues to take flight.

“My dad says for me to just remember what I do and remember the skills I possess,” said Julia. “He tells me to go out and do the best I can and to make the most of the experience and to most importantly, have fun!”

Julia knows that her parents have always been Positive Sport Parents. She also believes that it is important for many other parents to serve as Positive Sport Parents to other young snowboarders today.

“I think parents should keep positive and remind their kids not to settle for anything less than their best,” said Julia. “If parents don’t stay positive, sometimes the kids get discouraged and end up hating the sport they’re doing, then wind up quitting.”

To read the full TAKE 5 interview with Julia, visit PlayPositive.com. And come back next month for another exclusive TAKE 5 interview!

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of positivity shown by people every day. We created Play Positive, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display positivity. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the hill.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and Positive Coaching Alliance. All rights reserved. This material may not be distributed without express written permission. Any reproduction in whole or part by and individuals or organizations will be held liable for copyright infringement to the full extent of the law.


Tue, 16 Sep 2014 14:59:53 +0000

Athlete Spotlight: Faye Gulini

With two Olympic appearances and six X Games under her belt, Faye Gulini knows what it takes to perform on the snowboardcross course. She has been climbing the ranks during her five years on the U.S. Snowboarding team, capping off the 2014 season with a 6th place finish at X Games and a 4th place in Sochi.

Faye hopes to have more podium finishes this season, but the most important thing is that she’s having fun. “I find that when I am having the most fun is when I excel the most in my sport.”

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

Name: Faye Gulini

Sport: Snowboardcross

How/when did you decide you wanted to compete: I started snowboarding when I was eight years old. I was encouraged by my older siblings who had all snowboarded at this time. In the beginning I hated it. I hated spending half the day on my bum and I hated having to unstrap for every flat section. But I stuck with it because I wanted to be cool like my brothers. When I was about 11 I really started to love it. At this point I could make it across all the flat sections and I fell very rarely. When I was 11 I did my first snowboardcross race. I was so terrified but I loved the feeling of being a competitor. I loved the bib and I loved seeing my name on the start list. I ended up winning that race, though I was the only competitor in my age class. That is when I knew this was something I would be doing for a very long time. 

Biggest accomplishment in your career so far: 4th place in Sochi. I never thought in my whole life that I would be an Olympian, however that dream came true when I was 17 years old competing in Vancouver. I was thrilled this year to have made the team again, the competition only got steeper and the season leading up to the games was quite stressful. Not many people can say they have competed in the Olympics, let alone twice, and I am happy to have walked away with a 4th place. I am still competing and plan to participate in at least one more Olympic Games. My biggest goal is to retire with an Olympic metal.

Favorite moment from Sochi: Touring around and watching all the events at the games with my father. It was such a treat to have him out there supporting me, although my whole family could not attend, I was blessed to have him there. He loves the Olympics as much as I do and between the two of us we did a pretty good job of tackling the games. We saw at least 10 events together and explored every venue we could.

Goals for next season: Continue having fun traveling and snowboarding. I find that when I am having the most fun is when I excel the most in my sport. I would love to have a few podium finishes, and like I said, the more fun I am having, the more likely I am to succeed.

Favorite snow destination: Spain; regardless of my location within Spain, I am thrilled to be there, the terrain has a lot to offer and the exploring is quite exciting as well. I always find that the people in Spain are so accommodating and nice.

Favorite non-snow destination: Barcelona; we have had multiple trips to Europe where we have spent a few days in Barcelona exploring on vespa scooters and enjoying Las Ramblas and its street vendors.

Favorite candy: Hershey's cookies and cream.

If you weren't a professional athlete what would you be: A full time student, education is so important.

If you could have dinner with one person dead or alive, who would it be: My mom; she passed away in a car accident when I was 5 years old. 

One thing you can’t live without: My brother Zach.

Favorite USSA athlete outside your sport: Whitney Gardner

Advice to others who want to follow in your footsteps: Have fun; you are way more inclined to be successful if you love what you do.


Tue, 09 Sep 2014 19:27:50 +0000

Being a Positive Sport Parent

It is important to be supportive and respectful, not only of your child, but also of the others on the team and of the coaches. As a parent, you have the power to help shape your youth athlete’s attitude about sports. 

It’s natural to get excited when watching your child compete but it is important to keep your emotions in check on the big day.  Here are some tips to help yoo.

1. Be supportive before the competition even starts. Tell your youth athlete you are proud of him/her, regardless of how well he/she rides.
2. Remind them that it’s normal to be nervous and to have fun even when conditions are hard.
3. Let the coaches coach; avoid instructing your child or other players from the sidelines.
4. Cheer for good runs and great efforts by all participants.
5. When the competition ends, set a good example for your child by thanking the officials, coaches, volunteers and resort personnel for their efforts.

After following these guidelines, go ahead and give yourself a pat on the back! And know that your support role doesn't end there.

Consider these three tips when talking with your children after they compete:

  • Talk only when your child is ready. If your youth athlete wants to talk about the competition, he/she will bring it up, maybe even on the ride home. If it seems like he/she doesn't feel like talking, respect that. Pushing your child to discuss a competition, or re-hash their run, especially if he/she did not perform well, may turn them off sports and decrease his/her desire to share his/her thoughts with you or ask your opinion.
  • Ask open-ended questions. Once the conversation begins, keep it going by asking questions your child can't answer with a simple "yes" or "no." For example, ask, “What did you think of the course today?” and "Who did you feel threw the biggest trick?"
  • Listen carefully. If you're experienced in the sport your child plays, it might be tempting to jump in and share your own stories as they are telling theirs. Be patient; make a conscious effort to listen to what they have to say about their experience. Let your youth athlete take control of the conversation, help them process their thoughts and emotions, and then determine whether or not there's a life lesson you can impart.

Be positive. Remind your child that you are proud of them, especially when the outcome doesn't go their way.

When you support your child before and during a competition, and communicate with them effectively after the competition, they will not only have a strong mental attitude, but they will also be more coachable, optimistic, and better able to handle the inevitable losses that are part of the youth sports experience.

For more advice and resources to help promote sportsmanship and a more positive youth sports experience to your kids, visit PlayPositive.com.

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of sportsmanship and integrity shown by people every day. We created Play Positive™, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the hill.

In an effort to benefit millions of youth athletes, parents and coaches, this article is among a series created exclusively for partners in the Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive™ program powered by Positive Coaching Alliance.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance and Positive Coaching Alliance. All rights reserved. This material may not be distributed without express written permission. Any reproduction in whole or part by and individuals or organizations will be held liable for copyright infringement to the full extent of the law.


Mon, 08 Sep 2014 14:43:36 +0000

Take the Pledge to Promote Good Sportsmanship and Earn $2500

Since 2007, Liberty Mutual Insurance has donated more than half-a-million dollars to deserving youth sports teams, leagues and organizations. The Play Positive™ Pledge, our latest program, seeks to continue that tradition of rewarding teams who demonstrate a commitment to sportsmanship and playing positive.

During each Pledge period, youth sports teams from around the country compete to rally their supporters to pledge to promote good sportsmanship. At the end of the period, the five Large Division teams and the five Small Division teams with the most Pledges will each earn $2,500 to help support their team. In the past, teams have used the monies to fund player scholarships, purchase new uniforms or equipment, pay for team travel expenses, or create opportunities for underprivileged kids in the area who want to play.

The first Pledge period opened on August 15 and closes October 15.  Learn more and get started today at PlayPositive.com/Pledge

 


Tue, 02 Sep 2014 16:45:06 +0000

Remembering Why We Play Sports

Reminiscing about the days when you played on your first sports team probably puts a big smile on your face. The friends you made, the coaches who helped train you, and all the fun you had taught you that there's more to the game than just winning or losing.

Unfortunately, many children today are not learning some of those same lessons because of a win-at-all-cost mentality growing throughout youth sports. For them, winning a game has become more important than the valuable lessons behind the game — the benefits of sportsmanship.

The good news is that many parents have noticed this change in attitude, and are working together to reinforce good sportsmanship in youth sports.

The 2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive Sportsmanship survey of 2,000 parents and coaches from across the country shows that half of the respondents believe sportsmanship has worsened since they were growing up. While winning is exciting and a great benefit to playing sports, winning ranks last in the lessons parents and coaches want youth athletes to learn.

Parents and coaches realize that they have a unique opportunity to teach their children valuable sports lessons, including:

  • Teamwork — Working together with fellow athletes to achieve a goal.
  • Sportsmanship — Teammates, opponents, parents, coaches and officials treating one another with respect.
  • Skills of Sport — Practicing to improve technique and skills.
  • Playing Hard — Giving 100% during practices and on game day.
  • Sacrifices — Committing to responsibilities and putting the team before the individual, even when tired or not in the mood.
  • Winning - Being a good winner and behaving appropriately when all the hard work and practice pays off with a victory.

When parents and coaches keep what’s really important in mind during the game, they help shift the spotlight onto the impact of good teamwork, hard work, sacrifices, friendships and specific athletic skills that are all more important than winning.

Download this helpful tool from Play Positive to remember why we play sports.

Post it on your fridge and share it with your friends!

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of sportsmanship and integrity shown by people every day. We created Play Positive™, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the hill.

In an effort to benefit millions of youth athletes, parents and coaches, this article is among a series created exclusively for partners in the Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive™ program powered by Positive Coaching Alliance.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance and Positive Coaching Alliance. All rights reserved. This material may not be distributed without express written permission. Any reproduction in whole or part by and individuals or organizations will be held liable for copyright infringement to the full extent of the law.


Tue, 26 Aug 2014 22:32:54 +0000

Athlete Spotlight: Taylor Gold

Taylor Gold went from rookie to Olympian in 2014, and with wins at the Copper Mountain Grand Prix and the Burton US Open, Gold is quickly making his mark in halfpipe snowboarding. Steamboat Springs was reason enough for Gold to spend his time honing the techniques of riding, but it wasn't until seeing the sport during the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City that he decided he wanted to be a competitive snowboarder when he was seven. When he's not on the snow, Gold loves to jump on the trampoline, skateboard and play guitar. Gold is taking time in South America this summer to focus on snowboarding and prepare for the upcoming season.

Sport: Snowboard Halfpipe

How/when did you decide you wanted to compete: I decided that I wanted to compete after I watched the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake. I thought that snowboarding looked really fun, and after a couple of years of riding, I was having an awesome time and wanted to try competing to progress my riding.

Biggest accomplishment in your career so far: I think winning the US Open has been my biggest accomplishment so far. Looking at the past winners, I consider myself lucky to be a part of a group like that. It's also one of the oldest snowboarding contests out there, and one started by snowboarders for snowboarders.

Favorite moment from Sochi: My favorite moment from Sochi, as cliche as it sounds, was walking into opening ceremonies. I've always dreamed of competing at the Olympics, and it's such a crazy feeling walking out with my teammates in front of the whole world.

Goals for next season: I want to add creativity to my runs, and do everything I can to be unique. I want to continue to go bigger, be consistent, and most importantly, stay healthy.

Favorite snow destination: Steamboat. I love going home. I ride all over the world, and I love exploring, but It's so fun to come home, know the spots, and be a tour guide for friends. Especially when we get a bunch of snow.

Favorite non-snow destination: Hood River, Oregon. Every summer we go to Hood to ride the glacier, but I love the town of Hood River for summer activities. There's so much to do, and there's a great vibe wherever you go.

Favorite candy: swiss chocolate.

If you weren't a professional athlete what would you be: I would be a college student with no idea what I want to do.

If you could have dinner with one person dead or alive, who would it be: Bill Murray

One thing you can’t live without: a suitcase


Tue, 19 Aug 2014 17:47:09 +0000

TAKE 5 with U.S. Snowboarding’s Ryan Wachendorfer

From lifelong friendships to powerful life lessons to everlasting memories of thrilling victories, there are many reasons for your kids to play sports.

As a parent, you can encourage your kids to participate in, or at least try, youth sports. With so many other factors and activities pulling them in different directions, it’s important to properly frame and discuss the many rewards of playing sports.

Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive sat down with U.S. Snowboarding standout Ryan Wachendorfer to get his thoughts on the importance of playing sports along with the life lessons he learned.

In our exclusive TAKE 5 interview Ryan told us that he believes the biggest life lesson taught by sports is that anything truly enjoyable or valuable must be earned in life – over time.

“The biggest life lesson I’ve learned through sports is that nothing in life worth having comes easy,” said Ryan. “A good work ethic will take you far and building strong relationships will go a long way.”

Ryan said that he still talks with his parents about the value of hard work in both life and sports, as well as the challenges that come with snowboarding.

“My parents and I talk about how overcoming challenges in snowboarding relates to life, and working hard is important,” said Ryan.

Ryan said that snowboarding offers several compelling reasons for kids to practice and compete out on the hills and slopes – along with many valuable lessons to be learned.

“Snowboarding is so much more than a sport, and there is so much to learn from snowboarding,” said Ryan. “I never thought snowboarding would take me all over the world and allow me to meet tons of awesome people that I will have relationships with the rest of my life.”

To read the full TAKE 5 interview with Ryan, visit PlayPositive.com. And come back next month for another exclusive TAKE 5 interview!

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of sportsmanship and integrity shown by people every day. We created Play Positive™, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off hill.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance Company


Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:40:21 +0000

Why Play Sports?

The lifelong friends you’ve made. The coaches you will never forget. The fun you had with the teammates who taught you there is more to sports than wins and losses. These are just a few of the reasons why you wouldn’t trade your youth sports experiences for anything in the world.

But will your children enjoy similar experiences?

Unfortunately, many of today’s children aren’t building memories such as these. They’re participating less and less when it comes to youth sports. Why?

Maybe the “win-at-all-costs” mentality that today pervades all levels of youth sports has taken much of the fun out of the competition. Maybe the relentless pull of new technology is responsible for luring our kids away from fields of play. Whatever the reasons, it is your job as a parent to encourage your kids to participate in, or at least try, youth sports.

If you don’t attempt to get your kids involved, not only will you assure that they miss out on very special sports memories, but you will also inadvertently perpetuate the general degradation of their health.

To help get you thinking about the ways to frame and discuss the many rewards of participating in sports to your kids, Liberty Mutual Insurance and Positive Coaching Alliance have outlined four of the central benefits of youth sports participation:

Fitness – Youth sports provide fun reasons for your kids to get off of the couch and get active.

Friendships – Teammates often become life-long best friends.

Wisdom – From learning how to overcome individual challenges to how to succeed on a team, youth sports is the platform from which many of life’s most valuable lessons are learned.

Focus – The mental preparation that it takes to succeed in youth sports provides the groundwork for being successful both in school and later in life.

For more advice and resources to help promote sportsmanship and a more positive youth sports experience to your kids, visit PlayPositive.com.

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of sportsmanship and integrity shown by people every day. We created Play Positive™, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the hill.

In an effort to benefit millions of youth athletes, parents and coaches, this article is among a series created exclusively for partners in the Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive™ program powered by Positive Coaching Alliance.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance and Positive Coaching Alliance. All rights reserved. This material may not be distributed without express written permission. Any reproduction in whole or part by and individuals or organizations will be held liable for copyright infringement to the full extent of the law.


Mon, 11 Aug 2014 17:17:39 +0000

Introducing Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive™

Liberty Mutual Insurance is excited to announce our Responsible Sports program is now called the Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive™ program.

We will continue to deliver the same great resources and tools driven by our longstanding content partner Positive Coaching Alliance

 

This fall, join the hundreds of youth sport coaches and parents who will take our Play Positive Pledge to promote good sportsmanship in youth sports.  Teams that recruit the most supporters have the chance to earn $2,500. Learn more at PlayPositive.com/Pledge

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of sportsmanship and integrity shown by people every day. We created Play Positive, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the course.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance


Mon, 04 Aug 2014 20:43:11 +0000