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Accidents Happen. Call in Relief.

Brought to you by the Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports program

 

Liberty Mutual Insurance understands the responsibility that comes with being a snowboarding parent. And we’re committed to helping you always get home safely.

·       A standard auto insurance policy with Liberty Mutual Insurance covers a lot – including liability, collision and personal injury protection. And when you add our optional 24-Hour Roadside Assistance coverage, you’ll never have to worry about being stranded. From a jump start to a tow, 24-Hour Roadside Assistance will get you and the whole team moving again – at any time of day or night.

·       With 24-Hour Roadside Assistance coverage, you can call our dedicated number anytime, anywhere, and receive roadside assistance. This coverage requires purchase of towing and labor coverage, and is subject to applicable limits.

·       When you add our optional Unlimited Rental Coverage, we’ll pay your rental car costs for as long as it takes to repair your vehicle. You must purchase this coverage and elect to have your vehicle repaired at a Liberty Mutual-approved facility and allow us to arrange for the rental car. * Program availability varies by state and daily limits apply.

·       If your automobile is totaled in the accident, the Liberty Mutual Insurance optional Better Car Replacement™ coverage will give you the money to replace your totaled vehicle with an automobile that is one model year newer and has 15,000 less miles on it.

·       To ensure maximum safety and peace of mind, we also offer an umbrella policy that extends your coverage even further. It’s a small price to pay for a whole lot of peace of mind on the road. 

·       Make sure you don’t get stranded on your way home. Talk to one of our licensed sales representatives in your community or call us toll-free at 888-712-2166 to learn more and get a free, no-obligation quote today. Or visit us online at LibertyMutual.com or ResponsibleSports.com

*Liberty Mutual approved facility not required in the state of New York

**Optional coverage. Applies to a covered total loss. Deductible applies. Does not apply to leased vehicles and motorcycles. Not available in NC.

The descriptions of coverages and benefits are necessarily brief and are subject to policy provisions, limits, deductibles, and exclusions that can only be expressed in the policy itself. Coverages and programs vary by state and are not available in all states. For a complete explanation of coverages, please consult one of our sales representatives or call 888-712-2166.

 

Coverage underwritten and provided by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and its affiliates, 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA 02116.

 

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance Company


Mon, 21 Jul 2014 17:55:28 +0000

TAKE 5 with U.S. Snowboarding’s Alex Deibold

When our youth athletes strive to achieve their personal best, victory is won on and off the hill. Encouraging our kids to set individual goals and focus on maximum personal effort benefits both the player and the team – in a variety of ways.

Athletes who come to realize that personal development can be even more rewarding than a win are mastery-focused athletes who build the confidence and initiative needed to succeed – in sports and in life.

Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports sat down with U.S. Snowboarding star and Bronze Medalist at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games Alex Deibold to get his thoughts on personal bests, personal statistics and personal records.

In our exclusive TAKE 5 interview, Alex, who won his Bronze Medal for the U.S. in Boardercross, told us that he “definitely did not keep track of too many personal records” when he was a youth athlete.

“I was more focused on learning and having fun,” remembered Alex.

Alex said that today, he has a much sharper and clearer focus on personal records and goals.

“I am always trying to improve,” said Alex. “I want to continue to improve my snowboarding and to stand on more World Cup podiums.”

Alex told us that focusing in on these personal bests and goals gets easier as a youth athlete matures and grows into a seasoned veteran – but it’s never too early to start growing.

“When you’re young, it’s hard to see the big picture, but if you can make even small improvements over past personal records, then it’s a step in the right direction,” said Alex.

Alex believes that youth snowboarders and skiers can go a long way in that right direction simply by “focusing on the basics.”

“Even at the most elite level, the basics are something that are always extremely important,” said Alex. “It’s easy to get frustrated when you’re trying to learn something new or improve, but at the end of the day, it’s the little things that can make the difference.”

To read the full TAKE 5 interview with Alex, visit ResponsibleSports.com. And come back next month for another exclusive TAKE 5 interview!

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of responsibility shown by people every day. We created Responsible Sports, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display responsibility. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the hill.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance Company.


Mon, 14 Jul 2014 15:16:31 +0000

When Athletes Give Their Personal Best Everyone Wins

Victory is won on and off the course when youth athletes strive to achieve their personal best. Encouraging kids to set individual goals and focus on maximum personal effort benefits both the player and the team in a variety of ways. Athletes who come to realize that personal development can feel even better than a win are mastery-focused athletes who build the confidence and initiative needed to succeed in sports and in life.

Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports, in partnership with Positive Coaching Alliance, we offer the following helpful tips on how to encourage and inspire youth athletes to achieve their personal best:

  • Create a positive environment. Because meeting expectations plays a critical role in players developing self-confidence, a positive atmosphere focused on self-improvement lets athletes concentrate less on the importance of winning and more on the value of effort.
  • Set manageable goals. Help youth players identify and focus on areas that need improvement. Work with them to establish personal goals that will not only challenge their individual limits, but also inspire them to achieve new personal bests.
  • Offer support. Provide youth athletes with the resources, support and encouragement they need to perform at their maximum ability. When kids know they have the backing of parents, coaches and teammates, they’ll gain the confidence they need to strive for new levels of achievement.
  • Learn from challenges. Mistakes provide an opportunity for future success. So when players face setbacks and challenges, work with them to identify the lessons to be learned from the situation, as well as ways to quickly move forward.
  • Celebrate personal victories. While nothing quite compares to the rush of pride that comes from meeting or exceeding a personal goal, recognition of a job well done encourages youth players to strive for continued success.

The off-course lessons from on-course successes, setbacks and strivings deliver the true value of youth sports. The more coaches and parents can do to help interpret the on-course experience for youth athletes, the more youth will benefit in later life.

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of responsibility and integrity shown by people every day. We created Responsible Sports, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the course.

In an effort to benefit millions of youth athletes, parents and coaches, this article is among a series created exclusively for partners in the Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports program, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and Positive Coaching Alliance. All rights reserved. This material may not be distributed without express written permission. Any reproduction in whole or part by and individuals or organizations will be held liable for copyright infringement to the full extent of the law.


Wed, 09 Jul 2014 18:34:25 +0000

The Benefits of Playing Multiple Sports

For our kids, practicing and focusing on the sport they love is an important part of playing youth sports.  However, specializing in one sport from an early age can cause them to miss out on a number of benefits that could prove beneficial as they mature.

Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports and Positive Coaching Alliance share how playing multiple sports as a youth athlete offers up new learning experiences, the chance to grow both mentally and physically and protect against our youth athlete burning out.

But how do you encourage your youth athletes to branch out and try a new sport during the offseason of their favorite sport? 

Liberty Mutual Insurance has created a helpful tool that highlights some surprising and meaningful information on the benefits of playing multiple sports, ranging from improving diet and health, impacting academic performance, aiding in social development and helping prevent injuries.

We hope that these statistics help your youth athletes consider trying a new sport, if for no other reason than participating in a new and fun learning experience.

Download the tool here and be sure to check back next month for more tools to help keep youth sports a positive experience for our kids.

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of responsibility and integrity shown by people every day. We created Responsible Sports, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the course.

In an effort to benefit millions of youth athletes, parents and coaches, this article is among a series created exclusively for partners in the Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports program, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and Positive Coaching Alliance. All rights reserved. This material may not be distributed without express written permission. Any reproduction in whole or part by and individuals or organizations will be held liable for copyright infringement to the full extent of the law.


Wed, 02 Jul 2014 15:13:23 +0000

Nine U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association Athletes Nominated for ESPY Awards

PARK CITY, UT (June 30) – The U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association will be the most represented sports organization at the 2014 ESPY Awards with nine Olympic athletes nominated in five categories. Sochi gold medalists Mikaela Shiffrin (Eagle-Vail, CO), David Wise (Reno, NV), Jamie Anderson (S. Lake Tahoe, CA) and Maddie Bowman (S. Lake Tahoe, CA) are each nominated for two awards with Shiffrin up for Best Female Athlete, the top women’s honor. Kelly Clark (West Dover, VT), Kaitlyn Farrington (Bellevue, ID), Joss Christensen (Park City, UT), Sage Kotsenburg (Park City, UT) and Ted Ligety (Park City, UT) also received nominations. Fans can submit their vote for the awards at http://espn.go.com/espys/2014/.

HIGHLIGHTS

Nine U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association athletes have been nominated for five categories at the 2014 ESPY Awards.
The USSA as a team has more athletes and is nominated in more categories than any other professional sports organization.
Mikaela Shiffrin (Eagle-Vail, CO), David Wise (Reno, NV), Jamie Anderson (S. Lake Tahoe, CA) and Maddie Bowman (S. Lake Tahoe, CA) are each nominated for two awards.
Kelly Clark (West Dover, VT), Kaitlyn Farrington (Bellevue, ID), Joss Christensen (Park City, UT), Sage Kotsenburg (Park City, UT) and Ted Ligety (Park City, UT) also received nominations.
The ESPY Awards are based on fan voting. Fans can submit their vote for the awards at http://espn.go.com/espys/2014/.
The ESPY Awards will take place on July 16th at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, CA. Coverage begins at 9 p.m. EDT on ESPN.

QUOTES

Tiger Shaw, President and CEO, U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association

It is an honor to have so many of our sports acknowledged in this year’s ESPY Awards. Each of these athletes is outstanding in their own right, but it was their performance as a team that led to our success in Sochi. We are proud to have these athletes representing the USSA alongside some of the greatest professional sport athletes and teams in the United States.

2014 ESPY AWARDS

Best Female Athlete/Best Female U.S. Olympic Athlete – Mikaela Shiffrin
Mikaela Shiffrin (Eagle-Vail, CO) went from a rising star to one of the best ski racers in American history in a matter of years. In 2013, she became the first U.S. slalom World Cup champion since Tamara McKinney in 1983-84. She backed it up in 2014 with title number two by notching five wins. Shiffrin became the youngest woman in U.S. history to win a World Championship and the youngest athlete in history (male or female) to win an Olympic slalom gold medal.

Best Male Action Sports Athlete/Best Male U.S. Olympic Athlete – David Wise
The 2014 season was another standout year for halfpipe skier David Wise (Reno, NV) with gold at the Winter X Games, gold at the FIS World Championships, silver at X Games Tignes and winning a sixth U.S. National Title. He then topped it off with an AFP halfpipe title. Wise continued his stellar performance at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, becoming the first-ever Olympic gold medalist in halfpipe skiing.

Best Female Action Sports Athlete/Best Female U.S. Olympic Athlete – Jamie Anderson
After earning a silver medal in slopestyle snowboarding at X Games Aspen, Jamie Anderson (S. Lake Tahoe, CA) came out on top at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, winning the gold medal in slopestyle snowboarding’s debut.

Best Female Action Sports Athlete/Best Female U.S. Olympic Athlete – Maddie Bowman
In 2014, halfpipe skier Maddie Bowman (S. Lake Tahoe, CA) earned four podium finishes at five of the Olympic qualification events (two of them were wins). Before heading off to Russia for the Games, Bowman bagged her second-straight X Games gold medal in Aspen. At the 2014 Sochi Olympic Winter Games, she put down two unbeatable runs to take home the first-even gold medal for Olympic halfpipe skiing.

Best Female Action Sports Athlete – Kelly Clark
A three-time Olympic medalist, Kelly Clark (West Dover, VT) is a dominant force in the world of halfpipe snowboarding. After winning gold in 2002 and bronze in 2010, Clark easily qualified for her fourth-straight Olympic team and brought home a bronze medal from Sochi.

Best Male U.S. Olympic Athlete – Joss Christensen
Going into the 2014 Olympic Winter Games as an underdog, Joss Christensen (Park City, UT) threw down two amazing runs to win the first-ever gold medal for men’s Olympic slopestyle skiing. He led fellow Americans Gus Kenworthy and Nick Goepper in a podium sweep, marking only the third time in Olympic Winter Games history that the U.S. swept a medal event.

Best Male U.S. Olympic Athlete – Sage Kotsenburg
After a strong showing during the 2014 Olympic qualification process, Sage Kotsenburg (Park City, UT) walked away from Sochi with the first U.S. Olympic gold medal of the games and the first-ever Olympic gold medal in snowboarding slopestyle.

Best Male U.S. Olympic Athlete – Ted Ligety
Ted Ligety (Park City, UT) backed up his historic 2013 season with an Olympic gold medal and World Cup title in 2014, once again solidifying his place among the all-time greats. His Olympic gold medal from Sochi made Ligety the first man to win a giant slalom gold medal, which also marked him as the only man in U.S. history to win two Olympic gold medals in alpine skiing.

Best Female U.S. Olympic Athlete – Kaitlyn Farrington
After winning the final event of the Sprint U.S. Grand Prix and securing her spot on the 2014 Olympic team, Kaitlyn Farrington (Bellevue, ID) earned the halfpipe snowboarding gold medal in Sochi.

 


Fri, 27 Jun 2014 20:26:29 +0000

Athlete Spotlight: Jacqueline Hernandez

Name: Jackie Hernandez

 

Jacqueline “Jackie” Hernandez grew up snowboarding on a small hill in New York called Hunter Mountain and moved to Stratton Mountain School with her family where she attended high school. Jackie’s success in 2012, when she won the snowboardcross World Cup in Valmalenco, Italy, got her a spot on the U.S. Snowboarding team for snowboardcross.

Several top-10 finishes in 2014 landed Hernandez a spot on her first Olympic team. A fall in the qualifying run in Sochi left her hungry for more success in the upcoming season. She now lives in Salt Lake City, Utah where she attends Westminster College and trains at the Center of Excellence in Park City and lives with fellow athletes Maddie Bowman, Alexi Micinski, and Whitney Gardner. When she isn’t competing in snowboardcross, Jackie enjoys going skiing and snowboarding (a woman of many talents) with friends, hiking, biking, and going on family motorcycle rides in Vermont.

 

Sport: Snowboardcross

How/when did you decide you wanted to compete: I was 10 I did my first competition at Hunter Mountain just for fun times with my brother.

Biggest accomplishment in your career so far: Making the Olympic Team and winning my first World Cup in Valmalenco, Italy in 2012

Goals for next season: I’d like to podium at X Games for sure! Another World Cup podium, and maybe top 10 for World Cup Overall.

Favorite snow destination: Valmalenco, Italy, Hunter Mountain NY, Keystone early season. Wherever my friends are at, friends make snowboarding fun.

Favorite non-snow destination: St. Augustine, FL

Favorite candy: Sour Patch Watermelons

If you weren't a professional athlete what would you be: Race car driver for sure, even though they’re still athletes, or maybe a heart surgeon.

Favorite USSA athlete outside your sport: John Teller (Skicross). He’s the man.

Biggest vice: Bagels and Netflix

Biggest pet peeve: Arrogance

Advice to others who want to follow in your footsteps: It doesn’t matter if people look at you and think you don’t look the part, you can still be an athlete. You can be the shortest on your basketball team and still be MVP. Thick or thin you can be a star!  

 

 


Wed, 25 Jun 2014 22:18:08 +0000

Four Ways Playing Multiple Sports Can Help Your Child Become A Better Athlete

It's exciting to watch your children excel at the sports they love. Working hard toward a personal best or perfecting a specific technique are critical to success, but let’s not forget that playing multiple sports can be tremendously beneficial in the long run.

Branching out from just one sport offers youth athletes both physical and mental benefits, from enhancing current skills, to learning to appreciate the new skills required of a different sport. Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports, in partnership with Positive Coaching Alliance, has outlined four ways playing multiple sports can help your child become a better athlete and a more well-rounded person:

1.     Mental Growth: Training in new sports can help open youth athletes’ minds to new experiences and, in turn, help them become better at their preferred game. When an athlete is accustomed to playing one sport, branching out to a new one may seem scary, but the challenge of learning a new sport can prove to be rewarding. And conquering that challenge may provide even greater confidence to fuel success in the athlete’s original sport.

2.     Physical Improvements: Regardless of the sport your children most enjoy playing, many skills and techniques transfer across sports and complement each other. For example, water polo and softball both involve throwing, and both call for short bursts of energy, but water polo also requires sustained energy that can add a dimension of endurance that softball does not usually demand. The physical benefits of practicing new sports allows youth athletes to build upon their skills as well as discover previously unknown talents and abilities.

3.     New Experiences: Many seasoned athletes know that playing multiple sports provides a great opportunity to gain perspective on different team roles and become a more well-rounded player. For example, if your child is the star forward on her soccer team, she might find it beneficial to learn a new role on a volleyball team.

4.     Avoid “Burnout”: Parents can unknowingly put a lot of pressure on their kids to specialize in a sport or become ultra-competitive. Too much pressure can cause a child to become resentful, feel overwhelmed, or “burnt out” on a sport to the point of wanting to quit that sport – and maybe even quit all sports. Encouraging your children to take a break from one sport to try another can relieve stress and help their outlook.

It might be difficult to imagine your youth athletes starting a new sport, especially when they are good at the sport they love. But the love of the game can be the very reason that  you would suggest playing other sports, particularly once you realize how playing multiple sports can benefit your children’s mental health, fitness, and overall performance as they learn and grow athletically.

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of responsibility and integrity shown by people every day. We created Responsible Sports, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the hill.

In an effort to benefit millions of youth athletes, parents and coaches, this article is among a series created exclusively for partners in the Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports program, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and Positive Coaching Alliance. All rights reserved. This material may not be distributed without express written permission. Any reproduction in whole or part by and individuals or organizations will be held liable for copyright infringement to the full extent of the law.


Wed, 18 Jun 2014 14:40:30 +0000

New Survey Identifies Decline in Sportsmanship

Now that snowboard season has wrapped up, a new national survey of 2,000 youth sports parents and coaches by Liberty Mutual Insurance illuminates a troubling decline in what some would say is the most important lesson of youth sports: sportsmanship.  The results generated new resources and information available to help address this important issue head on.

The survey reveals that sportsmanship is considered among the most important lessons taught by youth sports.  Regrettably, approximately 50 percent of parents and coaches believe that sportsmanship has worsened in youth sports since they participated as children, while only 12 percent feel it has improved.  Yet, survey results suggest it may be their own behaviors that are contributing to this perception: 

  • 60 percent of respondents reported either witnessing or participating in negative or abusive sideline behavior
  • 26 percent of parents said they have witnessed a verbally abusive coach, and 16 percent of parents said they have witnessed a physical confrontation between parents
  • 55 percent of coaches have experienced parents yelling negatively at officials or their own kids, and two in five have experienced parents yelling negatively at other kids

Further, 75 percent of parents and coaches say that teaching sportsmanship is the responsibility of parents.  With 80 percent of parents responding to the survey claiming to play an active role in their child’s youth sports experience, the challenge isn’t parental involvement; it’s taking the time to instill the value of sportsmanship in their children.

“Growing up as a youth athlete, my coaches and parents were constantly using examples of poor behavior on the field as an opportunity to teach me about the importance of sportsmanship,” said actor Chris O’Donnell, a father of five and the Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports ambassador.  “Those lessons have stuck with me over the years, and now as a father of children involved in youth sports, I know the opportunity lies with us as parents to have the conversation and reinforce this important life lesson.”

Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports provides just the types of resources that parents need to have a meaningful discussion with their children about sportsmanship and other aspects of the youth sports experience that extend into everyday life:

  • Start with a simple question, “What Is Sportsmanship?" – focus conversation on abiding by rules and respecting opponents and officials and teammates
  • Explain that sportsmanship doesn’t have an off switch – reinforce that sportsmanship is important win or lose, even on the practice hill
  • Commit to Mom and Dad’s role in sportsmanship – express that your child’s effort and learning is more important than wins and losses and that leading by example is the best way to exhibit sportsmanship

“The value of sportsmanship is an essential part of developing youth athletes into responsible adults,” said Anthony Storm, senior vice president and Chief Marketing Officer, Liberty Mutual Personal Insurance. “Through this survey, we have pinpointed that sportsmanship is on the decline and there is a greater need for parents to reinforce this important life lesson.  Our Responsible Sports program provides the resources and tips to properly arm parents for this discussion.”

More results from the survey, as well as the wide range of resources, tools and information that Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports offers to support youth sports parents and coaches who help children succeed both on and off the hill, can be found at ResponsibleSports.com.  Parents and coaches can join the conversation by visiting the Responsible Sports Facebook page. 

About the Study

As a leading resource in youth sports, Liberty Mutual Responsible Sports program commissioned ORC International to conduct a national survey to uncover attitudes and perspectives towards youth sportsmanship in both parents and youth coaches.  2,000 parents and coaches of 7-12 year olds who participate in organized youth sports participated in the survey, resulting in a margin of error +/- 1.99%.

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of responsibility and integrity shown by people every day. We created Responsible Sports, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the hill.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance


Tue, 10 Jun 2014 19:52:39 +0000

Starting the Sportsmanship Conversation

The hyper-competitive youth sports environment has, in some cases, created a culture that has become accepting of poor sportsmanship.  This culture of competition is putting the positive youth sports experience that we want for our kids at risk, threatening to ruin the sport for them.  As a parent, what can you do to fight poor sportsmanship and reverse this trend?

One of the most impactful things you can do is simply have a conversation with your kids on the topic of sportsmanship.

Are you wondering how to start the conversation on sportsmanship? Download our helpful handout which includes 4 easy steps:

  • Step 1: Start with explaining What Is Sportsmanship?
  • Step 2: Talk about When Sportsmanship Happens
  • Step 3: Discuss What To Do When You See Bad Sportsmanship
  • Step 4: Talk about Your Role As A Parent Is In Sportsmanship

While truly reversing this “win-at-all-costs” mentality cannot solely be accomplished with a single conversation, it is the first step in creating a culture that promotes and displays sportsmanship in youth sports.  It is your chance to remind your kids that sports can be much more than a series of games that are won or lost.

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of responsibility and integrity shown by people every day. We created Responsible Sports, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the field.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and Positive Coaching Alliance. All rights reserved. This material may not be distributed without express written permission. Any reproduction in whole or part by and individuals or organizations will be held liable for copyright infringement to the full extent of the law.


Tue, 03 Jun 2014 23:12:09 +0000

Big Air-Team SBX Proposed for 2018

BARCELONA, Spain (June 3) – On the heels of the successful debut of new Olympic events like slopestyle snowboarding, the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association (USSA) is proposing the addition of two new Olympic snowboarding events. The USSA will make its formal proposal to the International Ski Federation (FIS), the sport’s governing body, when its entire membership meets June 1-6 in Barcelona for its FIS Congress for the inclusion of big air snowboarding and team snowboardcross. Big air has been contested at the FIS World Championships since 2003 while SBX has been an integral and popular Olympic event since 2006.
 
 

 
HIGHLIGHTS
  • The U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association has submitted an initiative to the International Ski Federation asking for FIS to propose the addition of big air snowboarding and team snowboardcross as new Olympic events to the International Olympic Committee.
  • Big air snowboarding has been a part of the FIS World Championships since 2003. Snowboardcross has been one of the most popular Olympic events since 2006.
  • Big air has also been one of the premier events at X Games for many years. Team snowboardcross made its World Championship debut in 2013 and has been a regular part of the FIS World Cup and Sprint U.S. Grand Prix, including a World Cup stop in downtown Denver in 2011 that attracted over 14,000 fans.
  • The proposal has multi-national support, including approval of the FIS Snowboard Committee.
  • The inclusion of SBX would come from within the same athlete pool as presently exists, while it is anticipated that most of the big air field would come from slopestyle athletes.
  • Action sports events like halfpipe, slopestyle, big air and snowboardcross are among the most popular with youth and have played a vital role in driving broadcast viewership worldwide.
 
QUOTES
Tiger Shaw, President and CEO, U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association
It’s vital that we keep our sports fresh and relevant to youth. We clearly saw the global benefits with the additional new events in Sochi. This is yet another step to keep the Olympics in sync with what excites kids in sport today and to build the brand of FIS.
 
Jeremy Forster, Snowboarding and Freeskiing Program Director, U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association
America has long been the epicenter of action sports. We’ve continually taken a leadership position in pushing new events in the past with SBX, slopestyle and the new freeskiing events. We have strong multi-national support for this initiative and are optimistic that FIS and IOC will work together to get these events onto the program for 2018.
 
Alex Deibold,USA,  Olympic SBX bronze medalist
Team SBX would be a great addition to our sport. It adds a whole new dynamic and makes snowboardcross even more exciting. There is also the potential to have mixed gender racing which would be something totally new and different, and a step in the direction of equality. In an individual sport it adds a much-needed team dynamic, helping athletes work together when they normally would not. Most importantly to me, it is fun, and that is the reason we all started snowboarding.
 
Mark McMorris, Canada, Olympic slopestyle bronze medalist
It’s a good move for snowboarding to have a third freestyle aspect added to the games. It’s another opportunity to win more medals and push the limits as to what is possible on a snowboard.
 
Sage Kotsenburg, USA, Olympic slopestyle champion
As we have all seen with the addition of halfpipe into the Olympics, it became a viewer favorite. When slopestyle was added, it was also one of the favorites with the third most streams of the entire games and one of the most watched sports. With big air, it would bring even more snowboarding to the world and, if we do it right it, would benefit snowboarding and the Olympics.
 
I would actually be really excited about big air being in the Olympics. The first and foremost important thing I would like to see happen would be figuring out the best format that would benefit the riders and the viewers.
 
Lindsey Jacobellis, USA, Olympic SBX silver medalist
I would love for there to be a team SBX event to show how diverse our sport is, as well as how much fun it is to watch.
 
If it were to be added it would give us another chance for a medal. Our sport has so many uncontrolled variables, so the more chances we get the better odds for a medal to come home for Team USA.
 
We have teammates but we race individually. So once the gate drops the whole ‘teammate’ is out the door. If we were to have a team race, there would be strategy involved and we could build a different dynamic to the sport. Team SBX would bring  a whole new level of excitement if it was added to the Olympics.
 
Alex Pullin, Australia, two-time snowboardcross World Champion
The team event is a great way to get the most out of a course built for FIS World Cup, World Championships and Olympics. Not only is it a way to give the riders more opportunities to race, but more so to get the most out of a track with a different style of racing, rather than a double event. It¹s great for spectators and at the end of the day its more racing and action. I support the idea to have the team event as an Olympic discipline in 2018.
 
Dominique Maltais, Canada, two-time snowboardcross Olympic medalist
These two displines have a lot of potential. Snowboardcross has been one of the most watched sports in three Olympics. Having team snowboardcross as an offical discipline at the Olympics would give us more visibility, helping athletes to have better sponsors, making our sport grow and the providing an opportunity for youth to see the team spirit  in our sport.
 
 
USSA PROPOSAL TO FIS CONGRESS
The inclusion of snowboarding has provided FIS and its National Ski and Snowboard Associations with a youth-oriented, innovative platform which has led to exciting new Olympic events, attracted new competitors and inspired new participants, and provided valuable new opportunities for sponsors, organizers, and media partners. It has also delivered high numbers of spectators and TV viewers – particularly at the Olympic Games – and has provided strong exposure to winter sports to a young audience.
 
Snowboarding defines itself through progression, and FIS has been a leader in establishing the most progressive events in its World Championships and, ultimately, the Olympic Games. This has added to the FIS brand, and established it as an innovative, youth-oriented international federation, which has been recognized by the International Olympic Committee as well as the media in the mission to adapt the Olympic program to be relevant to today's youth and markets.
 
Snowboarding continues to progress, with events like big air and team SBX, which have been well- received by athletes, organizers, spectators and media. Team SBX has provided a true national team event, which is lacking in the sport at the Olympic level. And Big Air has been a spectacular centerpiece to the World Championship since 2003.
 
We respectfully request that FIS continue to foster the progression of snowboarding, and formally request to the International Olympic Committee the inclusion of snowboarding's most relevant events in terms of youth, media, broadcast, commercial and spectator interest into the Olympic Games.
 

Tue, 03 Jun 2014 06:14:20 +0000